THE BENEFITS OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION



Did you know that :

¬ In Canada, employment rates are higher for French/English bilinguals than monolinguals.

¬ Canadians who speak both official languages have a median income nearly 10% higher than that of those who speak English only, and 40% higher than that of those who speak French only.

¬ Learning a second language does not impede normal language or speech development, and may even help facilitate better pronunciation and comprehension, especially when commenced during the critical period between 9 months and 4 years of age.

¬ Bilingual individuals have been shown to be more creative and better at planning and solving complex problems than monolinguals.

¬ Children who speak more than one language demonstrate superior control, attention, focus and strategizing skills, which positively impacts both their academic and their social future.

¬ The earlier the acquisition of two languages begins, the more likely learners will acquire native-like phonological skills. A bilingual advantage is unlikely to occur in individuals who have only taken a foreign language course and use it infrequently.


ACADÉMIE

EMERSON

ACADEMY

BILINGUAL MONTESSORI & PRIVATE FRENCH IMMERSION

The Best  of Both  Worlds

References:


1. Bialystok, E., Craik, F.I.M., Klein, R., & Viswanathan, M. (2004). Bilingualism, aging, and cognitive control: Evidence from the Simon Task. Psychology and Aging, 19, 290-303.


2. Canadian Council on Learning (2008). Parlez-vous français? The advantages of bilingualism in Canada. Available online: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/pdfs/LessonsInLearning/Oct-16-08-The-advantages-of-bilingualism.pdf


3. Center for Applied Linguistics. Benefits of being bilingual. Available online: http://www.cal.org/earlylang/benefits/marcos.html


4. Genesee, F. H. (2009). Early childhood bilingualism: Perils and possibilities. Journal of Applied Research on Learning, 2 (Special Issue), Article 2, pp. 1-21.


5. Poulin-Dubois, D., Blaye, A., Coutya, J & Bialystok, E. (2011). The effects of bilingualism on toddlers’ executive functioning. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 108 (3), 567-579